This site is currently being built for the 2017 conference. Data may be incorrect, incomplete, or missing entirely.

Click the icons below to access author handouts.

Studio E • Saturday morning, 9:00–10:30

Time, Form, and Affect

Judy Lochhead (Stony Brook University), Chair

Robert Baker (The Catholic University of America)

Pitch, Form, and Time in Two Works by Henri Dutilleux

Mariusz Kozak (Columbia University)

Affect as Form: The Joy of Time in Toshio Hosokawa's Vertical Time Study I

Abstracts

Pitch, Form, and Time in Two Works by Henri Dutilleux

Robert Baker (The Catholic University of America)

Henri Dutilleux described his croissance progressive (progressive growth) technique as a process in which “thematic elements” undergo gradual development such that by the end of the work, they “reach their definitive form” (Potter, 1997). But this directional quality is questioned by some works whose main element from the beginning also appears at the end, suggesting, as Dutilleux stated, “a notion of time as circular” (Nichols, 1994). In this paper, I consider two works, Ainsi la nuit (1976), and Mystère de l’instant (1989), to show a broader conceptualization of the progressive growth technique in two ways. First, I expand upon existing analyses by Potter, Monpoel and Hesketh to reveal new evidence of Dutilleux’s technique in Ainsi … in relation to pitch material by way of tri-chord pair analysis rather than the typical unordered hexachord approach to the opening chord. Second, I argue connections between movements in both works with Boulezian conceptions of smooth and striated time, and, in this light, show temporally proportional analyses of Dutilleux’s work that reveal goal-oriented formal locations consistently signified by a disruption or negation of metered subdivision and coordination. To more fully realize these implications, I draw a connection to Deleuzian theories on Chronos versus Aiôn, the undivided extended present versus a durationless instant separating past and future. In conclusion, I argue that the progressive growth technique can be understood to operate beyond conventional pitch and rhythm relationships, carrying deeper connections on levels of musical time and form.

Affect as Form: The Joy of Time in Toshio Hosokawa's Vertical Time Study I

Mariusz Kozak (Columbia University)

Despite its evocative title, Toshio Hosokawa’s Vertical Time Study I (1993) for clarinet, cello, and piano does not seem to cast any ambiguity on the issue of time. In fact, it unfolds in a relatively straightforward, linear manner, and appears to develop its initial gesture within a squarely conventional form. Thus, the trio begins with low intensity, builds up to a climax by fragmentation and an increase in rhythmic activity, and eventually returns to the quiet opening. However, this reading obscures an unusual temporality that underlies the piece, a temporality that might very well be construed as “vertical,” if only in the sense of contradicting the more typical “horizontal” impulses of teleology or closure. To highlight this aspect, I propose that the development of the trio’s opening gesture is cast within a structure that can be effectively explicated using formal properties of affects. In this paper, I argue that affects are socially constructed and culturally stipulated spatial and temporal forms of our engagement with the world. Based on the premise that musical structure is created by listeners as they affectively engage with music, I suggest that when used as analytical tools, the formal properties of affects offer a productive framework for interpreting contemporary music in which composers challenge traditional concepts and experiences of temporality. I demonstrate this claim by exploring how Hosokawa is able to contravene the illusory sense of linear development by using intensities—loudness, articulation, and silence—as materials that shape the recurrence of the opening gesture.